Friday, January 18, 2013

Grace






The other night, Zephie and Pippi were having a quiet play before bed.

I heard crying from the bedroom and unusually, it came from the eldest of my two rug-rats.

I entered the room to find my darling daughter wielding a plastic golf club above her head. Zeph was cowering in the corner, crying.

She had whacked him over the head with said club (lady baby in the bedroom with the golf club).

As Zeph recounted the preceding events, he told me 'She thought my head was a drum and she beat it'.

In those words I heard complete and utter innocence as well as unspeakable grace.

It struck me, at what point do we learn to ...... be cynical?


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13 comments:

  1. We have a plastic golf club in our house - does more harm than good. Everyone goes running when our youngest has it. Happy days x

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  2. is it wrong that I had a little giggle?? I have confiscated so many toys that could be used as weapons and my girl is always the one about to use them on her older brother. I think its pure frustration on her part.

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  3. Oh Lordie!!! This did make me a laugh a little but how sad!! You know it's funny, my youngest Ginger, is a girl and she I also more of the bully if you will:) little rascals!!!! Xoxoxo Hanna

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  4. hehe! oh the sweetness of sibling love! xx

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  5. Not sure when it is we learn to be cynical, maybe around the same time we stop finding joy in the simple things of life. My two sisters and I use to regularly beat each other up, elder even pushed younger of a balcony of our two story house, peach tree broke her fall and all she ended up with was a broken collar bone. I say all as it could have been much worse. Anyhow, we use to torture each other, but then we were and still the best of friends.

    http://iliska-dreams.blogspot.com.au/

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  6. Humans have been cynical/blaming eachother since the fall in the garden of eden. It is more natural to be cynical than graceful. But our children do mimic us and obviously you and Dave set a wonderful and graceful example for your children to aspire to and demonstrate. I have gained much from this post Em. I feel a little rebuked as I know I am quite cynical in front of my children instead of showing them how to extend grace. And for you to see your child extend grace to the other must warm the cockles of your heart. This made me smile from my head to my toes! xxx

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  7. Oh this is just gorgeous ( the grace not the clubbing incident). Cannot answer that question but my six year old is telling everyone he meets that he really just wants to sell his little sister on ebay. mel x

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  8. Sweet grace :) Love the word 'thought'...

    Sophie xo

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  9. Oh poor Zephie, his response is gorgeous. It's a bit of a shock when they start to get all grown up in their sayings isn't, dear little thing. Hope his head is okay!

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  10. Grace is a wonderful thing, how lovely that he thought the best of his sister...
    coincidentally we were playing Cluedo earlier today ;) x

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  11. I had a little giggle I couldn't help it. How mature is Zephie though most kids would hit back, he is going to do really well when he goes to big school the teachers will love him xx

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  12. I hope he retains that sense of believing the best of others. Grace and Mercy are in short supply in our hardened, cruel world.
    Blessings,
    Rosemary

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  13. Oh Em, the beautiful difference between boy/girl vs boy/boy siblings. My two terrors are always wrestling, which turns into fighting or someone getting hurt. Never a dull moment unfortunately. It is a lovely thing that Zeph doesn't think his little sis is capable of intentionally trying to belt him ;) xo

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Thanks so much for your words of encouragement, advice and solidarity.

xo em